Moxie — a bold nature

June 1st   2019

___ A person with moxie has courage, confidence, and a bit of a daring nature.

Such a person oft brings people’s mouths agape, and in the aftermath, tends to exude an air of individual style and class.

History
“Moxie” was a popular medicine in the 1870’s that claimed to “build up your nerve.”

 In the 1880’s the name “Moxie” was put on one of the first mass-produced soft drinks — that outsold Coca Cola at the turn of the century.

By 1930, the “Moxie” beverage fell from popularity, yet the word became popular slang.

Definition today
Today, “Moxie” is a noun. It is something to have. Yet few have it.

A person with moxie has confidence in their presence, who they are, and what they are doing at the given time. A person with moxie owns it, and cares not whether they do or don’t. They only act by nature upon it. Their onlookers think they have “nerve,” in a manner tasteful enough to command admiration.

Have you encountered someone who has moxie?

References: Dictionary.com, Online Etymology Dictionary, Merriam-Webster.com.

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This Jacquée T. Writer in Residence Word of the Day is brought to you by supporting sponsors including Thoughtful Investor blog, based in Topeka.

*** Jacquée T. selects and schedules each featured Word in the spirit of writing, reading, and of improved expression. ‘Love for Words’ sponsors support her schedule and selection as a whole, and the spirit of this series. Please check out the links to sponsor websites, one link provided per featured Word, and see how they may add inspiration to your day.

5 thoughts on “Moxie — a bold nature”

  1. I love this word! I’m sad to hear it less often…I think I’m going to have to use MOXIE more often though! Moxie is the perfect word for Rennies too! They’ve all got moxie deep from within!

  2. This is a word I haven’t heard since moving to Kansas! It’s definitely been a minute. Will have to see what kind of respond I get using it at home with the wife! Will definitely check out your next article for more “old-new” words

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